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    The Next Generation

    "Without teenagers the rock business wouldn't be here," says Who frontman Roger Daltrey. He's been pioneering cancer facilities for teens in the US and Britain.
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    The Next Generation

    "Without teenagers the rock business wouldn't be here," says Who frontman Roger Daltrey. He's been pioneering cancer facilities for teens in the US and Britain.
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    1/1210 Celeb Quotes on Cancer
    Wanda Sykes

    While receiving lab results from her 2011 breast-reduction surgery, Wanda Sykes discovered she had breast cancer. She chose to have a double mastectomy because she learned her mother’s side of the family had a history of the disease. On the Ellen show that year, Sykes told the audience, “Talk to your family. It’s not a secret. It’s not anything you should hide. Let your family know so that way they know what to look out for.” Later during the interview, she joked about her decision to discuss her illness publicly. “I was like, I don’t know. Should I talk about it, or what? Because how many things can I have? You know: black, lesbian. I’m like, I can’t be the poster child for everything.” [Gallery by Megan Bedard]

    2/1210 Celeb Quotes on Cancer
    Michael Douglas

    “You don’t quite know what to expect,” Douglas told Matt Lauer on the Today Show in 2011 after receiving chemotherapy for throat cancer. “All of a sudden, the affection from my family, from my friends, and from my fans hit me at a much deeper level than I would have ever imagined before.”

    3/1210 Celeb Quotes on Cancer
    Cynthia Nixon

    Cynthia Nixon was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2006. She has stressed the value of normalizing cancer and changing the tendency to see people suffering from the disease as just patients. “People with cancer are still people,” she told the Seattle Times.

    4/1210 Celeb Quotes on Cancer
    Harry Belafonte

    Harry Belafonte was diagnosed with prostate cancer in the ’90s. He has since strived to dispel myths about the disease and urges survivors to get on with life. “Make it work. Live life as fully as possible,” he told the Los Angeles Times.

    5/1210 Celeb Quotes on Cancer
    Sheryl Crow

    Sheryl Crow learned a lot from her experience with breast cancer in 2006. “I’m always the last person I take care of,” Crow said on Larry King Live. “And it really demanded that I show up for myself. And a lot of the women that I have spoken with who have gone through the cancer experience say that there is a metaphysical aspect of nurturing that’s related to breasts. And a lot of women just are always giving out nourishment and nurturing, and not receiving it. And, so, this was my time to really learn that.” In 2012 Crow scared fans when she revealed that she had a benign brain tumor, but her rep clarified that it was not a concern and she is perfectly well.

    6/1210 Celeb Quotes on Cancer
    Michael C. Hall

    Michael C. Hall survived Hodgkin’s lymphoma and is now healthy thanks to what he calls the fortunate circumstances of having a treatable illness and good insurance. “I didn’t beat anything,” he told Salon in December 2012. “And people who die of cancer don’t lose their battle to cancer.”

    7/1210 Celeb Quotes on Cancer
    Melissa Etheridge

    Though having breast cancer tested her sanity, Etheridge says it was ultimately a gift since it caused her to view her life differently. “I have never known such love and good energy that is coming to me every day. Every moment,” she told Dateline NBC in 2005.

    8/1210 Celeb Quotes on Cancer
    Kylie Minogue

    “When you are stripped of everything and you have to grow your eyelashes back, grow your hair back, it’s just astonishing,” Minogue told British Glamour magazine of her experience with breast cancer in 2005. Years later she reflected, “a deep psychological and emotional shift has obviously taken place.”

    9/1210 Celeb Quotes on Cancer
    Fran Drescher

    After seeing eight doctors over two years, in 2000 Fran Drescher finally landed on her diagnosis: uterine cancer. Today she advocates early testing under healthcare coverage to create “a world in which no woman has to die of cancer due to late-stage diagnosis.”

    10/1210 Celeb Quotes on Cancer
    Christina Applegate

    After an MRI in 2008 alerted Applegate to cancer in her breast, she opted for a double mastectomy and became an advocate for testing. “Some insurance companies consider the tests exploratory, which is just ridiculous,” she told People. “I mean, it saved my life!”

    11/1210 Celeb Quotes on Cancer
    Take Part

    The Breast Cancer Patient Protection Act would require health insurers to cover a hospital stay of at least 48 hours after a mastectomy. By signing the petition, you'll be joining the Susan G. Komen Foundation, the General Federation of Women's Clubs, and other top organizations in supporting the passage of this bill and telling top lawmakers in the House and Senate to prioritize women's health.

    12/1210 Celeb Quotes on Cancer
    More Great Reading

    Did you know that different geographic areas have higher rates of certain types of cancer? Learn about which types of cancer are most prevalent in the United States.

    Celebrity Hero
    by Alison Singh Gee, TakePart.com

    Eva LaRue: Special Agent in the Fight Against Cancer
    Eva LaRue shares at least one quality with her CSI: Miami alter ego, Natalia Boa Vista: Both women get big things done. LaRue has been a passionate activist and spokesperson for several cancer-fighting causes. Most recently, she joined forces with Susan G. Komen for the Cure to narrate United in Hope: A Global Journey, a stunning documentary about how cancer affects women in developing countries. Here’s what she had to say about her experience on this project and what the rest of us can do to fight cancer across the world.
    Q:
    How did you become involved in the fight against cancer?
    A:

    Seven years ago I was a spokesperson for the National Ovarian Cancer Coalition. My grandmother and great-grandmother both died of ovarian cancer.

    Q:
    Have others close to you battled cancer? What did you take from that experience?
    A:

    I had a friend from high school who found out she had breast cancer. She fought the disease for five years. Watching her struggle, I saw how it decimates a family financially. Both my friend and her husband were schoolteachers. When she developed cancer she had to quit her job, so they were down to one teacher’s salary to support that household. We all did pancake breakfasts to fundraise for her. We did what we could to keep her in that house. But during her last year, she tried experimental treatments that weren’t covered by insurance. Every pill cost $200. It was financially devastating.


    That’s why I also got involved with Beckstrand Cancer Foundation, based in Orange County. The foundation financially supports people going through cancer treatment.

    Q:
    What did you learn about women and cancer in each of the countries featured in Susan G. Komen’s documentary about cancer in the developing world?
    A:

    In Africa, having cancer is still very much a stigma. They touched on this a little bit in the film. Not only are you sick and fighting for life, but if anyone knows you are suffering from cervical cancer, you can be considered untouchable.


    In Sarajevo, there was a woman who couldn’t even get radiation therapy in her own town. She would only go home on the weekend because she had to travel too far. Imagine feeling nauseous and weak, your hair falling out, having to get on a bus and travel eight hours by yourself, and then getting to the hospital only to find out the radiation machine is broken. When I watched that, I just thought, oh my gosh, we have to raise money and get a machine.


    The story about the woman in Mexico was heartbreaking. Her boyfriend left her because she had a mastectomy, and he couldn’t deal with what had happened to her. So she was nursing a heartbreak at the same time as fighting for her life.

    Q:
    Which moment in the video did you find most powerful?
    A:

    I was astonished at how hard these women struggle. You wouldn’t blame them for wanting to go curl up in a corner and suck their thumbs. And yet they find the determination and spiritual strength to go out and start their own cancer movements, developing the awareness and outreach to their communities. They want to help others to be diagnosed earlier so they have a better chance of survival. These women have gone and turned it around—from asking themselves, “Why me, God?,” to saying, okay, this is my opportunity to be an angel and help others on Earth.

    Q:
    What can people do to support Komen’s international work?
    A:

    Of course, financial support is always helpful. So far, I have experienced Komen as brilliantly organized and inspirational and motivational. They do an enormous amount of good. They’ve spent a billion and a half dollars for research and awareness. Education is everything. The more women know about their bodies and diseases that are out there, and the more they know about different cancer breakthroughs and how medicines can effect them, the better care they are able to take of their own bodies. I am one of the former ignorant who has been enlightened by working with this cancer organization.


    Watch

    United in Hope

    This documentary from Susan G. Komen for the Cure tells the stories of three women from developing countries who’ve overcome unfavorable odds to survive cervical and breast cancers.
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    United in Hope

    This documentary from Susan G. Komen for the Cure tells the stories of three women from developing countries who’ve overcome unfavorable odds to survive cervical and breast cancers.
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    Susan G. Komen for the Cure® is expanding its international footprint in the fight against breast and cervical cancer around the world. Please consider a donation to the Global Promise Fund to support these efforts to save women’s lives.
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